"This book is absolutely brilliant!
Original, gripping, and inspiring.
It brings to life the untold stories of
the Civil War, drawing the reader in
from the beginning and just getting
better as it goes along.“

~Historian David Williams Author of 'A People's History"
THE UNDERGROUND MOON
The Underground Moon tells the story of Dimitrius’ adventures as he tries to help feed his family during this confusing, perilous time. My favorite characteristic of Dimitrius? He’s curious as a cat… can’t resist nosing in where he doesn’t belong, while at the same time he has the built-in caution of someone who lives at the constant edge of danger.
Really? The Civil War?

This is what most of my friends asked when I told them I was
writing The Underground Moon, a book that’s set during the American
Civil War. I am not a person who studies war. I have never considered
myself much of a history buff, although now that I’ve studied this era, I
have to say it’s pretty interesting stuff. Originally, though, my motivation
came from a different place.


I wanted to hear the voices that, during my years of schooling, had
always felt absent from everything I read about this period of American
history. When an editor at a writer’s conference mentioned that it would
be interesting to see a new Civil War novel with a male protagonist, I
instantly envisioned Dimitrius, the protagonist of The Underground Moon.
I wanted to hear about life from his perspective – that of a fourteen year
old black teenager who was born free when all of the other black folks in
town were enslaved.


The Underground Moon tells the story of Dimitrius’ adventures as he tries
to help feed his family during this confusing, perilous time. My favorite
characteristic of Dimitrius? He’s curious as a cat… can’t resist nosing in
where he doesn’t belong, while at the same time he has the built-in
caution of someone who lives at the constant edge of danger.
Here's a passage from The Underground Moon that shows what I mean.

More Praise...

“The Underground Moon was good because we’re
studying the Civil War in school, and when I read
the book, I could see it. I could feel it.”



“I liked it that the main character was black. I wish
more books we read for history had black
characters in them.”



~ 7th and 8th grade students, Atlanta, Georgia


​ 


Here's a description of Big Pops from The Underground Moon​ 



Instead of working the plantation, Big Pops spent his last years tending the mill,  turning stalks of sugar cane into hot molasses for anybody who brought him their crop. Dimitrius had helped every chance he got, tending the pot of black, shiny syrup ’til the frog-eyes popped up, all the while chatting with Big Pops. As an old timer who never snitched, all the tales came to Big Pops, especially the ones about runaways. And Big Pops whispered them to Dimitrius.


“They call it the underground railroad,” he liked to say, feeding stalks into the mill with his small, spotted hands. “But the rungs on that railroad are secrets. Places a
person can hide in, and signals to tell how to get there.